TEFL jobs in Morocco

To get a work permit for Morocco, you need either a degree plus a TEFL/TESOL certificate or a BA degree in TESOL. Another stipulation is that applicants can’t be over 60 years of age, and there are restrictions on how many foreign workers an organisation can hire – no more than 50% of staff can be foreign. You apply for your work permit after arriving in the country. If a school tries to hire you without a work permit, or is happy to hire you even if you don’t have all the necessary qualifications, this should be a red flag that you need to look for a different job.

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Where to find work in Morocco

While not necessary, a little knowledge of French will be particularly helpful when applying for jobs here, so if you can brush up on your school French, it will put you in good stead. Another handy thing to know are the cultural norms which will help you get along with your co-workers. In Morocco, it’s quite common to interrupt someone when they’re talking and it’s not necessarily seen as rude. However, confrontation of any sort is frowned upon – if you need to criticise something, do it in private, rather than speaking to someone directly and causing them to lose face. When you’re looking for jobs, don’t just stick to the tourist locations like Marrakech and Casablanca – there are hidden gems where you’ll find cheaper prices, less street crime, less pollution, and more authentic local experiences.

Employers in Morocco

The American Cultural Association hires TEFL teachers who are native English speakers, have at least a BA degree and a TEFL certificate, and at least two years’ of teaching experience (some of which must have been abroad). You’ll be teaching both children and adults. Qualifying candidates can apply directly through the website with a CV.

The American Language Center’s Casablanca branch looks for full-time teachers, preferably North American but British teachers are also welcome to apply. You need to be a native speaker, have a BA degree, a minimum of a TEFL certificate, and at least 1 year of overseas teaching experience. Contracts are for 12 months starting in October. You’ll have 18-22 contact hours per week, often during the evenings and weekends for adult classes, but there are some young learner classes at different times. The pay is from 188 – 208 dirhams (£14.50 – £16) per hour, as well as a housing allowance, settling-in allowance, medical insurance, and flight reimbursement.

Another ALC branch, in Rabat, looks for those who preferably have a BA in Education or TESOL, a knowledge of French or Arabic, and TEFL certificate from a face-to-face course. Contracts are for 1 year, with 18-22 contact hours per week, generally from 2pm to 9pm on weekdays, and 9am to 5pm on the weekends. Most students are aged from 14 to 35. The pay is around $1,500 per month.

Amideast looks for native English speakers with a TEFL certificate. Contracts are for one year, working 70-100 hours per month. You will receive a settling in allowance and assistance in searching for an apartment.

Chantiers Sociaux Marocains is a non-profit NGO where those aged 18 to 60 can volunteer as a language teacher. It’s an advantage to speak French or Arabic. Camps run in July and August for Moroccan teenagers aged 15 to 18. Classes are for 25 to 30 students, and you’ll be teaching 4 hours a day, Monday to Friday. You’ll live with a local host family.

Moroccan Voluntary Work organises trips for foreigners to volunteer doing different types of work in Morocco, including TEFL teaching. Volunteers are provided with room and board, and other perks such as Arabic lessons. The website is a bit clunky with some broken hyperlinks so it might be best to phone or email them directly if you’re interested.

Read our Morocco Country Guide for info about salaries, living costs & requirements

Morocco Country Guide



Unfortunately we don't currently have any jobs available in Morocco. Our job centre is updated daily so check back soon!

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